<html><head><meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"></head><body dir="auto"><br><div dir="ltr"><br><blockquote type="cite">On Jun 27, 2021, at 09:30, Carl Karsten <carl@nextdayvideo.com> wrote:<br><br></blockquote></div><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><br></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Sun, Jun 27, 2021 at 7:56 AM john doe <<a href="mailto:johndoe65534@mail.com">johndoe65534@mail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">On 6/27/2021 9:17 AM, Carl Karsten wrote:<br>
> On Sun, Jun 27, 2021 at 2:10 AM john doe <<a href="mailto:johndoe65534@mail.com" target="_blank">johndoe65534@mail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
><br>
>> On 6/27/2021 7:03 AM, Dominik wrote:<br>
>>> Hey Carl,<br>
>>><br>
>>> On Sat, 2021-06-26 at 19:16 -0500, Carl Karsten wrote:<br>
>>>> I'm looking for advice on haveing some boxes to have both dynamic and<br>
>>>> static IPs.<br>
>>><br>
>>> Why use a static IP at all? We have often enough seen people use static<br>
>>> addresses for the wrong reasons.<br>
>>><br>
>><br>
>> As I understand it, the OP wants to use DHCP static leases.<br>
>><br>
><br>
> No.<br>
><br>
> I need this for when move put a box on someone else's network.<br>
> So I don't have any control over the dhcp server.<br>
><br>
<br>
Then set an fix IP on dhcp client (dhclient ...) and remove it when you<br>
don't need it.<br>
<br>
Basically, you set the dhcp client to have a static address or let the<br>
client get a lease from a dhcp server.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I'm trying to reduce the amount of work I need to do when I show up and discover there is no dhcp server.<br></div><div><br></div><div>Example locations: university, coffee shop, convention center, office meeting room.   In all cases I am a guest for a few days.  <br></div><div><br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
<br>
Why do you need dnsmasq into the mix?<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I don't - I am just working on client config.<br></div><div><br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
<br>
--<br>
John Doe<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Dnsmasq-discuss mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Dnsmasq-discuss@lists.thekelleys.org.uk" target="_blank">Dnsmasq-discuss@lists.thekelleys.org.uk</a><br>
<a href="https://lists.thekelleys.org.uk/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/dnsmasq-discuss" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://lists.thekelleys.org.uk/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/dnsmasq-discuss</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br clear="all"><br>-- <br><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr"><span>Carl K<br></span></div></div></div>
<span>_______________________________________________</span><br><span>Dnsmasq-discuss mailing list</span><br><span>Dnsmasq-discuss@lists.thekelleys.org.uk</span><br><span>https://lists.thekelleys.org.uk/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/dnsmasq-discuss</span><br></div></blockquote><br><div>A couple things. It might help to state what the client device is running (Windows, Linux and what distribution/version). </div><div><br></div><div>dnsmasq is a DNS/DHCP server not a client, so I’m unsure what the role of dnsmasq would be here. </div><div><br></div><div>Most of the places you listed would already have a DHCP server available to hand out IP addresses (and associated network information) on its own. Otherwise, there’s no easy way to connect to the internet without knowing all that particular networks details (e.g. gateway address, subnet mask, etc, etc) which defeats the point of providing network access in a number of the locations you listed. </div></body></html>