<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><br></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Mon, Jun 28, 2021 at 7:07 AM <<a href="mailto:wkitty42@gmail.com">wkitty42@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">On 6/27/21 3:26 PM, Carl Karsten wrote:<br>
> On Sun, Jun 27, 2021 at 2:12 PM <<a href="mailto:wkitty42@gmail.com" target="_blank">wkitty42@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
> <br>
>     put another NIC in it and dedicat that NIC to your management access... assign<br>
>     it an IP in a weird RFC1918 block and you should be ok... this way you can<br>
>     always access it even if the other general purpose NIC is not connected to a<br>
>     network...<br>
> <br>
> how is this better than my current solution?<br>
<br>
because the two management NICs and crossover cable are your own and can be set <br>
so you always have access no matter what the other network is if you even have <br>
access to another network at the time...<br>
<br>
in other words, you will always have your own separate and private network <br>
between your two devices no matter if there is any other network connection on <br>
the other NICs... this solution is a separation of your devices connection <br>
between themselves and any other network... it provides you a dedicated <br>
connection between your two devices always...<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>That isn't better, it is equivalent. <br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
<br>
>     never connect this dedicated NIC to any other network outside of your<br>
>     complete control... <br>
> <br>
> That means I can't use venu lan and have to run my own cables.  Sometimes I run <br>
> my own cable, but If I don't have to it is nice to jack into existing wiring.<br>
<br>
no... you still use the venue cabling for the regular connections... the NICs <br>
i'm speaking of are solely for your use between your two machines and solely for <br>
your use in managing your two machines when you may have to reconfigure them for <br>
a new network on the other NIC... if this reconfiguring is not needed, it still <br>
provides you a dedicated network between the two machines without any other <br>
traffic from any other network... your command and control stays within your <br>
private network and the traffic you generate that needs to go externally does so <br>
on the existing NICs and venue cabling...<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Normally there is no command and control traffic.  <br></div><div><br></div><div>It is kinda like a wireless AP, or a dedicated router: you connect once to configure it, and then you rely on it just working.</div><div>Currently the config is done in a factory setting and I expect it to work when I deploy it in the wild. <br></div><div><br></div><div>The factory is either my house, hotel room or a room at the venue, and wild is where a lecture is being presented. <br></div><div><br></div><div>This might help describe how the machines are being used:</div><div></div><div><a href="https://debconf-video-team.pages.debian.net/docs/room_setup.html#room-setup">https://debconf-video-team.pages.debian.net/docs/room_setup.html#room-setup</a></div><div><br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
<br>
>     be sure to carry a crossover cable with you so you can<br>
>     connect that NIC with the one in your other device..<br>
> <br>
> "Newer routers, hubs and switches (including some 10/100, and all 1-gigabit or <br>
> 10-gigabit devices in practice) use auto MDI-X for 10/100 Mbit connections to <br>
> automatically switch to the proper configuration once a cable is connected." <br>
> <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medium-dependent_interface#Auto-MDIX" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medium-dependent_interface#Auto-MDIX</a><br>
<br>
that's all fine and good if you get NICs that can do that... i prefer to be sure <br>
to have all the possibly necessary tools in my bag of majik tricks... i've <br>
learned the hard way over the 30+ years i've been doing support in the industry...<br>
<br>
>     . in fact, you might want to<br>
>     use a dedicated management NIC in both devices so they can be set up with<br>
>     specific static IPs and always be accessible to each other...<br>
> <br>
> More hardware and more cables and make sure the right cables go to the right <br>
> hardware.  this does not sound better ;)<br>
<br>
you'll never know without trying it but first you need to be able to visualize <br>
it and the separation it brings... i mean, you're only talking about maybe <br>
another $30US investment in two NICs and another cable or two... so it isn't <br>
that expensive... and if your two machines are placed close together (as i <br>
assume them to be) then a 3foot to 6foot cable is all that is needed between the <br>
two NICs... and you can easily mark the NICs with RED coloring as well as your <br>
cable with RED so you know the RED ones are the ones that get connected...<br>
<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>The machines are at the front and back of a lecture hall.  or a meeting room,  so the distance varies. <br></div><div><br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
-- <br>
  NOTE: No off-list assistance is given without prior approval.<br>
        *Please keep mailing list traffic on the list unless*<br>
        *a signed and pre-paid contract is in effect with us.*<br>
</blockquote></div><br clear="all"><br>-- <br><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr"><span>Carl K<br></span></div></div></div>